Now What?

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Posts for Tag: louisville

From the everything old is now new again department...

I've recently discovered the usefulness of "vintage" lenses on modern, mirrorless cameras. These flower photo were taken with a 57-year-old Super-Takumar 1:4 / 50mm, adapted to my trusty Olympus OM-1 (OMD Systems, 2022) camera. This lens falls within the range of the radioactive Super-Takumars, so maybe that helped with the red/amber colors.

Through A Russian Lens

This is what happens when you take a 45-year-old lens made in the USSR, put it on a 5-year-old digital camera made in Vietnam, and hope that everything is blurry in the right places.

The lens is from a Zenit-E camera manufactured by Krasnogorsk Mechanical Works in 1977. KMW was located near Moscow, which was the host-city of the 1980 Summer Olympics. My copy of the Zenit-E was made specifically for the 1980 Summer Olympics and bears the logo of the 1980 Summer Olympic Games on its body. At that time, the USSR was second, only to Japan, in the manufacture of SLR cameras. I obtained my Zenit-E Olympic Model specifically because of its connection to the 1980 Summer Olympic Games, an Olympics in which the US and 65 other countries did not participate. Why?

The 66 countries boycotted the 1980 Olympics in response to the USSR’s invasion of Afghanistan, a war that was so costly to the USSR, that it has been cited by scholars as a contributing factor to the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The more things change, the more they stay the same…

How Way Leads On To Way...

I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence...

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,

And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

~Robert Frost

Broad Run Park

A beautiful sunset at Broad Run Park, Louisville, KY.

Profile Shot

This guy was nice enough to pose for a portrait. Looks like his antlers may have been at a crime scene.

Butterflies At Tom Sawyer Park

Two of the butterflies I saw this past weekend in Tom Sawyer Park

This first one, which is one of the varieties of Black Swallowtail, had huge wings. They were larger than any of the other Black Swallowtails I had previously seen. 


This Monarch butterfly was nice enough to stay in a dark area where the light could still shine through its wings. 


Louisville's Secret Outdoor Art Gallery...

In a world of moving pictures, I have always been more fascinated by still images. They seem to work on the brain in a different manner than moving images. If you read a lot of photography blogs, you will soon figure out that there are two photographic subjects that are despised by “serious” photographers. They are train tracks and cemeteries. “Too cliche,” the serious photo bloggers will tell you. Well, that may be, but what if you just want to capture beauty in whatever form you happen to find it? I’m sure I would enjoy photographing, not only trains (and their tracks) but planes and automobiles as well, but I just don’t have access to a large variety of different subjects in those genres.

Serious photographers will also say that you are wasting your time if you head out to make photos in the middle of the day, when the sun is harsh and contrasty. “Go out only during the ‘golden hours’ at dawn and dusk,” they will tell you. Well, there certainly is good light during those golden hours, but what if you only have access to a particular location or subject outside of the golden hours? What if your schedule doesn’t allow you to be choosy? Perhaps you could learn to deal with contrasty light and other impediments to satisfying photographs? It's worth a try.

I say photograph what you want, when you want, or when you can. Each press of the shutter button will teach you something about your camera, light, perspective, etc. and you will see things, both in your subjects and yourself, that you may not get the chance to see if you wait for the perfect time or place to start taking pictures and enjoying photography. I also like to think of myself as a conduit of images to people who, for whatever reason, can’t get out themselves, to see what I see. Whether it be deer in the local state park, or a particular work of art at the local outdoor art gallery known as Cave Hill Cemetery.

And, as much as I enjoy gathering photographs, I really enjoy getting a good look at them on the computer and editing them in a way that I find pleasing or even surprising. You’d be amazed at how much color one can find in what first appears to be a gray slab of granite! When you look intently at something, you will see more.

Back in the day there used to be a show called “CBS Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt”. Each episode would end with some usually eclectic story of a location, person, phenomenon, etc. to leave you with something to think about after the news portion of the show. The video would start rolling with some calm footage accompanied by a voiceover by Charles Kuralt describing what you were about to see. It was usually something you wouldn't see anywhere else

In the spirit of that show long ago, some photos from Louisville’s secret outdoor art gallery, all gathered in the last week or so.. Happy Sunday morning!

I Know That Look...

I'm not sure what Bucky McDeerface is thinking here, but I don't think I like it!

I See You...

That moment when you realize that your quarry is onto you...

Rare Turtle

The extremely rare, almost mythical, Pumpkin Spice Turtle (testudo graeca cucurbita spice). They are rarely seen in the wild but a lucky few may get to see one in mid to late October when they are migrating to their winter homes...

The poor guy's arms are too short to knock that ant off of his nose!